Underparenting

How much parenting is enough? How much too much?

An article in today’s Telegraph by free lance journalist Glenda Cooper reports on a movement calling for ‘underparenting’ to become the norm and for children to be allowed to play outdoors far more for their own good…

While child-centred parenting has been the norm for the past couple of decades, new research suggests that if we want to raise confident, well-adjusted, healthy children our style of parenting has to change. Forget the “helicopter parent” (who hovers continually over their offspring), the “lawnmower parent” (who tries to mow down all obstacles in their children’s path) or the “tiger mother” (a parent who hothouses her children to succeed academically, named after the bestselling memoir by Amy Chua). We should now be learning how to be “underparents” .

So what do you think? And what can Love Outdoor Play be doing to get more children out playing more often where you are?

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Comments
2 Responses to “Underparenting”
  1. Sarah says:

    I definitely think if you have a secure garden underparenting is easier done and pretty safe, however so many parents are scared that anything that happens to their child, even just a bruise, if it happens when their back is turned is their fault, its sad really, but I agree the fear of Child Services has massively grown. I think outdoor play is so important, and the facts speak for themselves, I try to show my friends how much fun their kids have in my back garden and show them a guide such as this one http://www.childrensfunkyfurniture.com/blog/best-outdoor-toys-to-benefit-your-childs-development/ on all the benefits on outdoor play.

  2. homemadekids says:

    I think underparenting is a fantastic concept. Though It’s v hard to do. it’s also rife with issues – middle classes can do “neglect” without fearing their kids will be taken from them. But lots of younger mums and less wealthy families, and those in the “disadvantaged” category (ie, working class) may have good reasons to avoid underparenting. Hence the ubiquitous use of screen and indoor playtime. Nicola http://homemadekids.wordpress.com

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